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Traits of a Successful Threat Hunter

Roger O’Farril, Information Security Team Lead, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
Posted: 8/21/2018 2:49:00 PM | Category: Security | Permalink | Email this post

Roger O’FarrilThreat hunting is all about being proactive and looking for signs of compromise that other systems may have missed. As defenders, we want to cut down the time it takes to detect attackers. To accomplish this, we assume the bad guys have penetrated our defenses, and then proceed to look for traces that their activities have left behind.

Putting aside the technical details, it is extremely important to consider the person, or perhaps the team, who is doing the hunting. I describe a good threat hunter as a person with a wide skill set who has “been there and done that” in multiples areas of IT and security. There are four main dimensions that help shape a good hunter:


Cybersecurity is a Proactive Journey, Not a Destination

Mike Wons, Chief Client Officer, PayIt
Posted: 8/17/2018 4:02:00 PM | Category: Audit-Assurance | Permalink | Email this post

Mike WonsCybersecurity continues to grab spotlight and mindshare as it pertains to computing and social trends.

The topic itself is broad and expansive, and the true impact of this segment of computing will be around for generations to come. For strong perspective on where the industry stands in its current state, ISACA’s State of Cybersecurity 2018 research is a must-read. This report provides a great assessment of what needs to happen in the cybersecurity field to move from reactive to proactive.


The AI Calculus – Where Do Ethics Factor In?

ISACA Now
Posted: 8/14/2018 2:39:00 PM | Category: ISACA | Permalink | Email this post

While artificial intelligence and machine learning deployment are on the rise – and generating plenty of buzz along the way – organizations face difficult decisions about how, where and when to introduce AI.

In a session Tuesday at the 2018 GRC Conference in Nashville, Tennessee, USA, co-presenters Kirsten Lloyd and Josh Elliot laid out many of the ethical considerations that should be part of those deliberations.

The pair detailed several instances of high-profile AI events over the past decade that highlighted the need to give ethical components of AI deployment a high level of focus early in a product or service’s design, as opposed to risking unforeseen fallout. The examples included the development of a controversial algorithm that predicted higher rates of recidivism for black defendants in the judicial system and a Stanford University study exploring how often AI could determine a person’s sexual orientation based on photos of their faces.


A Prominent Place at the Table for Rural Technological Advancements

Matt Loeb, CGEIT, CAE, FASAE, Chief Executive Officer, ISACA
Posted: 8/13/2018 2:54:00 PM | Category: Risk Management | Permalink | Email this post

Matt LoebWhen the general public thinks about today’s exciting technological breakthroughs, the imagery that springs to mind is unlikely to be a crowded pigpen in China or yam fields in the farmland of Nigeria. Yet, rural areas are the frontlines for some of the most important gains technology is enabling in modern society. The growing imprint of technology-driven advancements on the agriculture industry and in rural areas, generally, is one of the tech field’s most promising success stories.

Digital transformation is making its mark on the agriculture industry, with the Internet of Things, blockchain, robotics and drones among the technological forces that are helping to offset modern obstacles with which previous generations of farmers did not have to overcome. In the not-so-distant-past, farmers fretted about the weather, pests and their equipment – and that was about it. Today’s farmers must contend with a range of more sophisticated challenges, such as market volatility, international trade friction, serious labor shortages, borrowing costs and capital availability, and an increasingly complex regulatory environment.


Five Keys for Adaptive IT Compliance

ISACA Now
Posted: 8/13/2018 2:35:00 PM | Category: Audit-Assurance | Permalink | Email this post

The fluid technology and regulatory landscape calls on IT compliance professionals to be more flexible and proactive than in the past to remain effective, according to Ralph Villanueva’s session on “How to Design and Implement an Adaptive IT Compliance Function,” Monday at the 2018 GRC Conference in Nashville, Tennessee, USA.

The IT compliance function serves as an important bridge between the audit and IT departments, in addition to articulating business-related IT and security initiatives to management, and recommending and implementing appropriate compliance frameworks.

Business model changes, legal considerations, government requirements and evolving industry regulations are among the common reasons that organizations may need to more frequently explore switching their frameworks than in the past. Villanueva, IT security and compliance analyst with Diamond Resorts, referenced the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which became enforceable in May, as an example of a recent regulatory shift that could have significant compliance ramifications. Additionally, he cited industries such as banking, healthcare and gaming as having special requirements calling for the use of compliance frameworks.

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